Pipeline

Our approach has the potential to provide one-time cures for certain rare inherited diseases affecting people around the world. We are developing ex vivo autologous gene therapies for a range of serious disorders where the disease burden on children, families and caregivers is immense and current treatment options are limited or do not exist.

For more information about clinical trials of Orchard’s investigational therapies, please visit www.clinicaltrials.gov or contact us at info@orchard-tx.com.

Explore our pipeline below.

Neurometabolic/Neurodegenerative Disorders

Preclinical

Clinical proof of concept

Registrational trial

Commercialisation

Libmeldy

Designation: RPD

OTL-203 MPS-I

Designation: RPD; PRIME

OTL-201 MPS-IIIA

Designation: RPD

OTL-204 FTD

Libmeldy (OTL-200)

About MLD

Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) is a rare and life-threatening inherited disease of the body’s metabolic system. MLD is caused by a mutation in the arylsulfatase-A (ARSA) gene that results in the accumulation of fats called sulfatides in the brain and other areas of the body, leading to loss of sensory, motor and cognitive function.

For more information about MLD, click here.

About Libmeldy™ (atidarsagene autotemcel) (EU, UK, Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway)

Libmeldy (atidarsagene autotemcel) is an ex vivo autologous hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) in 2020 and is currently the only approved treatment for MLD. Libmeldy is an investigational therapy which has not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

In the EU, Libmeldy is indicated for the treatment of patients with metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD), characterized by biallelic mutations in the ARSA gene leading to a reduction of the ARSA enzymatic activity in children with i) late infantile or early juvenile forms, without clinical manifestations of the disease, or ii) the early juvenile form, with early clinical manifestations of the disease, who still have the ability to walk independently and before the onset of cognitive decline.

Libmeldy was developed in partnership with the San Raffaele-Telethon Institute for Gene Therapy (SR-Tiget) in Milan, Italy.

The most common adverse reaction attributed to treatment with Libmeldy was the occurrence of anti-ARSA antibodies (AAA). In addition to the risks associated with the gene therapy, treatment with Libmeldy is preceded by other medical interventions, namely bone marrow harvest or peripheral blood mobilization and apheresis, followed by myeloablative conditioning, which carry their own risks. During the clinical studies, the safety profiles of these interventions were consistent with their known safety and tolerability.

For more information about Libmeldy, please see the EU Summary of Product Characteristics available on the EMA website.

OTL-203 (MPS-I)

About MPS-I

Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS-I) is a rare, inherited neurometabolic disease caused by a deficiency of the alpha-L-iduronidase (IDUA) lysosomal enzyme, which is required to break down sugar molecules called glycosaminoglycans (also known as GAGs). The accumulation of GAGs across multiple organ systems results in symptoms including neurocognitive impairment, skeletal deformity, loss of vision and hearing, and cardiovascular and pulmonary complications.

For more information about MPS-I, click here.

About OTL-203

OTL-203 is an ex vivo autologous gene therapy being investigated for the treatment of MPS-I. It uses a modified virus to insert a functional copy of the IDUA gene into a patient’s cells. OTL-203 is being developed in partnership with the San Raffaele-Telethon Institute for Gene Therapy (SR-Tiget) in Milan, Italy. OTL-203 has received rare paediatric disease designation from the FDA. Through an ongoing proof-of-concept clinical trial, OTL-203 is being evaluated as a potential treatment for patients with the most severe form of MPS-I, known as Hurler syndrome.

OTL-203 is an investigational therapy and has not been approved by any regulatory agency or health authority.

OTL-201 (MPS-IIIA)

About MPS-IIIA

Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA (MPS-IIIA, also known as Sanfilippo syndrome type A) is a rare, life-threatening neurometabolic disease characterized by intellectual disability and loss of motor function. It is caused by a mutation in the N-sulphoglucosamine sulphohydrolase (SGSH) gene, resulting in the build-up of sugar molecules called mucopolysaccharides in the brain and other tissues. There are currently no approved treatment options for MPS-IIIA.

For more information about MPS-IIIA, click here.

About OTL-201

OTL-201 is an ex vivo autologous gene therapy being developed for the treatment of MPS-IIIA. It uses a modified virus to insert a functional copy of the SGSH gene into a patient’s cells. OTL-201 has received rare paediatric disease designation from the FDA and is currently being evaluated in an ongoing proof-of-concept clinical trial.

OTL-201 is an investigational therapy and has not been approved by any regulatory agency or health authority.

Immunological Disorders

Preclinical

Clinical proof of concept

Registrational trial

Commercialisation

STRIMVELIS®

Designation: RPD

OTL-103 WAS

Designation: RPD; RMAT

OTL-104 CROHN'S

Several additional research and preclinical programs under development. Libmeldy™ (OTL-200) and Strimvelis® have been approved by the European Medicines Agency and have not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration or any other health authority. In the U.S., OTL-200 is an investigational therapy. All other therapies in our pipeline are investigational and have not been approved by any regulatory agency or health authority.

About OTL-200/ Libmeldy™ (EU, UK, Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway)

OTL-200 (atidarsagene autotemcel), referred to as Libmeldy in the European Union, is an ex vivo autologous haematopoietic stem cell gene therapy approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) in 2020 and is currently the only approved treatment for MLD. OTL-200 is an investigational therapy which has not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

In the EU, Libmeldy is indicated for the treatment of patients with metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD), characterized by biallelic mutations in the ARSA gene leading to a reduction of the ARSA enzymatic activity in children with i) late infantile or early juvenile forms, without clinical manifestations of the disease, or ii) the early juvenile form, with early clinical manifestations of the disease, who still have the ability to walk independently and before the onset of cognitive decline.

OTL-200 was developed in partnership with the San Raffaele-Telethon Institute for Gene Therapy (SR-Tiget) in Milan, Italy.

The most common adverse reaction attributed to treatment with Libmeldy was the occurrence of anti-ARSA antibodies (AAA). In addition to the risks associated with the gene therapy, treatment with OTL-200 is preceded by other medical interventions, namely bone marrow harvest or peripheral blood mobilization and apheresis, followed by myeloablative conditioning, which carry their own risks. During the clinical studies, the safety profiles of these interventions were consistent with their known safety and tolerability.

For more information about Libmeldy, please see the EU Summary of Product Characteristics available on the EMA website.

Strimvelis®

Strimvelis (autologous CD34+ enriched cell fraction that contains CD34+ cells transduced with retroviral vector that encodes for the human ADA cDNA sequence) is a gammaretroviral vector-based gene therapy approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) in 2016. It was the first ex vivo autologous gene therapy approved by the EMA. Strimvelis has not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or any other Health Authority.

Strimvelis is indicated for the treatment of patients with severe combined immunodeficiency due to adenosine deaminase deficiency (ADA-SCID), for whom no suitable human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matched related stem cell donor is available. Strimvelis is intended solely for autologous use and must be given in a specialized hospital by a doctor who is experienced in treating patients with ADA-SCID and in using this type of medicine.

Serious adverse reactions include autoimmunity (e.g., autoimmune haemolytic anaemia, autoimmune aplastic anaemia, autoimmune hepatitis, autoimmune thrombocytopenia and Guillain-Barré syndrome). The most commonly reported adverse reaction was pyrexia.

For more information about Strimvelis, please see the EU Summary of Product Characteristics available on the EMA website.

Strimvelis®

Strimvelis (autologous CD34+ enriched cell fraction that contains CD34+ cells transduced with retroviral vector that encodes for the human ADA cDNA sequence) is a gammaretroviral vector-based gene therapy approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) in 2016. It was the first ex vivo autologous gene therapy approved by the EMA. Strimvelis has not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Strimvelis is indicated for the treatment of patients with severe combined immunodeficiency due to adenosine deaminase deficiency (ADA-SCID), for whom no suitable human leukocyte antigen (HLA)- matched related stem cell donor is available. Strimvelis is intended solely for autologous use and must be given in a specialized hospital by a doctor who is experienced in treating patients with ADA-SCID and in using this type of medicine.

Serious adverse reactions include autoimmunity (e.g., autoimmune haemolytic anaemia, autoimmune aplastic anaemia, autoimmune hepatitis, autoimmune thrombocytopenia and Guillain-Barré syndrome). The most commonly reported adverse reaction was pyrexia.

For more information about Strimvelis, please see the EU Summary of Product Characteristics available on the EMA website.

OTL-103 (WAS)

About WAS

Wiskott Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is a life-threatening inherited immune disorder characterized by recurrent and severe infections, autoimmunity, eczema and severe bleeding episodes. It is caused by a mutation in the gene that produces the Wiskott Aldrich syndrome protein, which results in abnormal function of white blood cells and low platelets.

For more information about WAS, click here.

About OTL-103

OTL-103 is an ex vivo autologous gene therapy being investigated for the treatment of WAS. It uses a modified virus to insert a working copy of the WAS gene into a patient’s cells. OTL-103 is being developed in partnership with the San Raffaele-Telethon Institute for Gene Therapy (SR-Tiget) in Milan, Italy. It has received rare paediatric disease designation and Regenerative Medicine Advanced Therapy (RMAT) designation from the FDA. Orchard is conducting ongoing clinical trials of OTL-103 for the treatment of WAS.

OTL-103 is an investigational therapy and has not been approved by any regulatory agency or health authority.

OTL-105 (HAE)

Hereditary angioedema

Program partnered with Pharming Group N.V